Category Archives: Chris

Hugelkultur Boxes?

Alright, so before we begin, this is all new to me. Actually, pretty much all gardening is new to me, but I’ve always been a bit adventurous and experimental, so here I am.

When I was a kid, my mom and my nana were gardeners. They had big gardens in the ground that got rototilled up at the start and end of every gardening season. I thought that was all there was to it.

Then my stepdad built some 4’x8′ raised beds instead of the traditional bed. They grew lots of food in them, and it seemed easier to look after. That seemed a lot better than packing down the soil in between the rows.

And now, since I have been looking into permaculture, I find out about hugelkultur. If you haven’t heard about it, click on the link. It’s pretty neato.

So, yesterday, we were at the dump tearing our trailer apart, when we found some pretty big crates. Once the deck was clear, we loaded them up and took them home. Gerri seemed a bit hesitant, but she is pretty good at letting me have my head.

When we got the boxes home, I set to figuring out what to do. I knew I was going to plant in them, but they were two feet deep, and I didn’t want to use that much soil or fill them up with rocks. Then it hit me.

Hugelkultur in a box!

I had just felled a couple of dirty poplar the day before, so I measured out the inside of the box and started sawing logs for the bottom. I also had a couple of dead birch limbs that went into the mix.

I didn’t say they were fancy.

I filled in the cracks with a mix of wet fruitwood chips and half finished compost. I figured it would help with the decomposition of the green wood.

Then I put in a layer of twigs and leaves.

I’m guessing that this is a decent nitrogen layer.

I don’t know if it was a good idea, but it seemed good in my mind, so why not? Experiments are for experimenting, right?

After that, some more soaked chips.

Should I keep going? Okay, I will.

I then put a few more inches of the composting mix, because why not? That’s what I’m making all of this beautiful, rich stuff for.

Mmmmmm, soily.

Now a friend, who shall remain nameless, grows in pots every year and then throws the soil mix out, because they think that they have used all of the nutrients in it.

Believe me, they haven’t. Last year I watched as they mixed their soil and there was peat moss, Pro-Mix® HP, some other organic fertilizer, perlite, bloodmeal, bonemeal and bales of compost.

It was absolutely beautiful. Then, in the fall, I was asked to help with a dump run and there were fourteen heavy black garbage bags in the pile. I asked what they were and was told they were full of the used soil.

So here they are now.

I’ve been mixing it into everything!

Other than it was full of roots and stems from the flowers, there was absolutely nothing wrong with it. A few hours of picking through and composting the browns gave me a lot of excellent soil for this year. I only hope that they grow the same amount again. I have already called dibs on it, and helped for free to sweeten the pot.

I soaked it all pretty good today, and I was going to mix up tomatoes and green peppers in here tomorrow. It gets about 7-9 hours of sunlight in a few different increments of 2-3 hours each where it is and from what I read, that is probably enough.

What do you folks think? Will this setup work? Should I be planting something else in it? I also have a few cabbage seedlings. I’m open to any feedback I can get.

My Little Worm Project

As I was  poking around on Red Worm Composting, I saw that Bentley was doing an experiment with four red wigglers in a ziplock bag of bedding and food. I thought it was pretty neat, so I borrowed his idea to try on my own. Just to see how long it would take to get a worm bin going with two breeding pairs of worms.

As you can see, I opted for a plastic tub container instead of a bag. That was mainly for my personal preference in being able to poke around in it to see any babies or pests that might have got in. (I killed a red mite and two fungus gnats in there already.)

In my experience with worms, so far, I have found that they like hiding in folds.

I use a lot of shredded newspaper in my bigger bins, because we get flyers and stuff here and there, but I find that the worms really like the paper that comes in the Amazon.ca boxes, so I used that. I think it’s kraft paper, but not sure. It comes pre-crumpled, and they love to burrow into the moist folds and lay their cocoons.

I also put a carrot, some chopped kale, and a bit of red pepper slurry in, so there were different stages of decomposition.

I did all of this on April 11, 2017. Today is May 1.

I noticed quite a few castings and the food seems to be getting eaten up pretty well. There is basically just carrot left, so it will soon be time to add some more. The bedding is holding up quite well, so I foresee it lasting quite a while longer. I don’t think I was quite prepared for the scope of this, because I know that the cocoons have been hatching, but it’s going to be a while before they are breeding.

See him/her poking their bum out? Right in the middle of the carrot.

Even though it will take a while, I realised that if someone did get themselves a dozen red worms, it would go by pretty quick until one day you looked in and had a pound or so.

Another worm butt.

I threw a little bit of potting soil in as well, for grit, but I’m also going to sprinkle ground egg shells in also. I will probably update this every few months, because I know now that every month won’t have many changes.

Oh yeah, one more thing before I go.

Unfocused babies, but babies nonetheless.

Chris

We Were Going to Rent a Chipper

Something like this one, but probably not from Amazon.

Between pruning and heavy snow damage, we lost a pile of our fruit, spruce, and lilac branches. Over the winter we tried to burn some of them in the fire pit, but that was  futile as it took more good wood to keep the fire going just to burn up a bit of lilac.

Sadly, this photo was taken today, April 20th.
This was April 19th. Way better.

We lamented about how nice it would be to have a chipper so we could mulch all of the piles up and at least get some benefit from the destruction.

 

We tried advertising locally to see if someone had one that they would like to rent out, but nobody responded, so we started looking at nearby rental businesses.

The problem is that the closest rental place to carry wood chippers is two hours away in Dawson Creek. There’s four hours of driving and at least $50 in gas on top of the $150 a day rental fee.

That’s for a chipper that will handle up to 3″ limbs or trees.

We couldn’t justify spending $1000+ on a new machine to mulch up a few piles of branches each year, so we started to look at local classified ads to see if there were any used ones for sale.

There wasn’t, but I did notice that there were electric chippers for as little as $200 when I Googled it, so I started to look into that option.

We really liked the design of the Earthwise GS70015, but it was more than double the price of similar units without the catch bin.

Then we found the same one with a different paint job at Canadian Tire for $199 and started to do a little research and comparisons. Overall, it seemed like a much better option, because we could easily trim our branches small enough to fit through the 1 1/4″ opening with the Cyndi Loppersand we loved the no cleanup aspect with the built in bin.

I had read a bunch of complaints about the product and the screws rusting into the blades and making it nearly impossible to get them out without stripping them, so I took the advice of one reviewer and put anti-seize on all of the screws before use.

Then we went out and fired that sucker up. It made great sized chips for mulch, and once the branches were cut down to size, it gobbled them up quite fast. It didn’t take too many crabapple branches to make this little box of gold.

I kind of want to roll around in them.

I’m going to do up enough to get 8″ of this stuff in the chicken’s run and let them work it around and build up some good compost. I wanted to try it in the coop for bedding, but I’m told that it isn’t a good idea for a few different reasons. All of the reasons include the girls’ health, so I don’t want to chance it. I was just hoping to save a bit of dough, because the bales of shavings are $10 a piece at the local feed store (which doesn’t seem bad after looking at Amazon), and that all adds up.

We also plan on making some good mulch for around the trees and in the gardens, so I will play around with the green/carbon ratios when I’m doing the chipping. I’m sure that I can find the right amount somewhere on YouTube.

Another thing we want to try is hugelkultur, so this is another way we will be able to use the chips and the bigger wood together.  I am going to  look further into it, but I do want to get at least one bed going this year.

I also got thinking that we might get a smoker and see if we can dry the fruit wood chips enough to use them for that. We have a bunch of crabapple, plum and apricot branches to do, so it would be free fuel. I mean why bury them when you can smoke meat to go along with your fresh veggies? 😉

Anyhow, if you are in the market for a little chipper, and you don’t mind a little extra work, you can save yourself quite a bit of money and hassle by shopping around for a small electric one. I can’t vouch for any of them right now, but this one seems like a good deal, and works really good so far. I will definitely update this if things go awry though.

Chris

P.S. If you get the Canadian Tire one, look at my review there. It will tell you about getting new blades from the company. What it won’t tell you is that they will send you free ones if you call before you have had it for two years and they wear out. That is all done over the phone, so you don’t have to take them into CT.

That’s if they weren’t lying to me, and if things don’t change in the next two years.

Third Generation Of Mealworms And A Little Update

Yep, the little farm is going quite well, in my opinion. Other than when the screen busted out of my top drawer, that is.

I guess I should get some more hot glue sticks

I think I had weighed it down too much, because I kept adding to it, and not thinking about the strain on the screen and glue. When large worms, pupae, and beetles started showing up in the drawer below, I reached in and saw the problem. Now everything is in the large bottom drawer, at least until I fix this up.

Nobody’s getting out of there until I let them

Good thing I bought the sieve set.

This isn’t the exact same as the one we bought, but they don’t seem to have it any more. It was about $10 cheaper than this one, and free shipping, so you should shop around to see what you can find. The nice thing is that we use it to sift the worm castings for the red worms as well. It works fantastic for that.

Anyhow, I also wanted to mention our project worms.

You may or may not have heard that mealworms can safely digest styrofoam, and turn it into soil-safe frass(poop). The only problem is that nobody has tested the actual worms to see if they are toxic. Well, they might have, but because they didn’t like their findings, maybe they didn’t publish them.

I’m just kidding. I shouldn’t accuse science of wrong doing, just because I suspect it. I just don’t understand why you would test the frass to make sure that it’s not toxic, but wouldn’t test a handful of the worms while you are at it.

I mean, you have the equipment right there. Literally. You just tested the worm poop with it.

Anyhow, that just means that I will have to keep this farm segregated from the other.

We don’t want the chickens to be eating potentially toxic food, and we sure don’t want to sell toxic worms to our customers.

Yeah, you heard me. We have three customers that occasionally buy some worms for their pets. We’re not going to get rich off of it, but I am socking each $3 away until I can buy this with it.

Eventually I want to go to this one, but at close to $700, it will be a while.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While we can’t go to full on homesteading right away, we are trying to acquire the skills and tools we will need for when we do get there. To finance the purchases, we aren’t using our wages from our regular jobs, but I took a very part-time maintenance job that bought us the distiller and we have the eggs bartered away until this summer, but after that we will be able to put the money from a couple dozen a week into the fund. We will also probably break even soon from the soap business, but I think that anything we make from that will go back into upgrading our equipment to some more efficient systems.

Soon we will be getting a pressure canner, but we are still researching which way to go with that. Apparently the Presto 23 quart is not as high quality as the All American 21 1/2 quart, but there is much less maintenance, and it’s less than half the price. Many people have had their Presto for over twenty years, so we figured that the savings are worth the risk. I don’t see them at thrift stores very often, but I don’t know if it would be worth chancing a used one that you don’t it’s history.

We are also looking at food dehydrators as well, so if anyone has a recommendation for anything, we are always happy for any information we can get. Amazon reviews are okay, but actually hearing, firsthand, of other people’s experience is the best way to gauge quality and usefulness.

We Bought A Joykit Water Distiller

For any of you that make soap, you know that the recipes seem to always call for distilled water. We weren’t sure how important it was, but we figured that it was best to go with what all of the experts said about it.

So we bought jugs of distilled water at the store. They were $4.49 each, and they didn’t always have them in stock, especially in the summer. We also didn’t like the waste of all of that plastic, so an alternative option was always on the horizon.

Then we went over to our friend’s newly built home in the country, and as they were showing us around, I noticed a 20L water bottle with a siphon hose coming out of it. Of course I inquired, so they explained that they distilled their own water, because of the contaminants in it.

They showed us their Megahome distiller, and said that we were welcome to borrow it anytime we wanted to. We accepted and went home to fill our jugs up with free (other than the electricity and a bit of vinegar for cleaning) distilled water.

We were very impressed with the results. We were soon Googling these distillers to see about purchasing one for ourselves, because after putting a few jugs through, we were shocked by the scale and sludge left behind. Even from our delicious, treated town water.

This was after less than ten gallons through it.

We started using it for drinking, as well as soap, and while I don’t notice any health benefits from it, I do prefer the taste, or lack thereof. We also like not having any of whatever is in the water coming from the tap.

I know that there are a lot of beneficial minerals, etc… in our water, but I can tell by the stainless steel bowl, that there are other things in there as well, and they might not be as good for you.

After doing a bit of research, we found that adding some pure salt, that is rich in trace minerals, to your distilled water will give it a bit more of the “water flavour” that people find lacking in it. It will also help give back some of the good stuff that was removed during the distillation process. That salt just happens to be what we had on hand, but you could save a ton if you bought this one and ground it up yourself.  (Just to make it easier to dissolve. I believe it’s the exact same salt, just in a coarse grind.)

So anyhow, I was going through my Amazon app to show Gerri the distillers that were cheaper than the Megahome one, when I accidentally clicked on the Joykit 4L Distiller. I didn’t realize that the 1-click ordering was enabled on the app, so within a few seconds I had purchased this sucker.

It was less than half of the other one, so we weren’t too worried, but we found a couple more that are probably the same, and are even less expensive. One is the Sodial and the other is the TMSL, although I don’t like that it has a glass jug that you have to put together. Glass has bad luck at our house, which is too bad, because I trust it more than plastic, ecology-wise.

We can’t vouch for any of these, except the Megahome and the Joykit, but from a glance they look all the same. If anyone tries one of the others, please leave a comment on here and let us know how it works for you. We have figured out that ours has almost paid for itself now, if we go by the jugs that we were purchasing. I know that in bigger centres you can get distilled water much cheaper, but we don’t live there.

This is where she sits and pumps out a jug every night for us.

Another thing that we are going to try, is liquid trace minerals to add to the water we are going to drink. I think we will try this one first, based on price alone, but if anyone has any other tips or ideas, we are certainly open to hear them.

If we get any updates on this, we will let you know, and thanks for checking it out.

Chris

My First Foray Into Veterinary Medicine

***First off, I wouldn’t have done much at all had I not joined the BYC community. Almost everything I have learned about chickens, so far, has been from reading articles and interacting on their forums.***

A few months ago I saw Henny P doing a weird dry heave thing, but not opening her mouth. I followed her around and watched her, but other than that, she was acting completely normal.

This is what it looked like.

Not knowing much about chickens, I just figured it was because they were all different and had their own little quirks. Then, a week or so after I noticed her odd neck movements, she quit laying and her chest was all puffed out like there was an orange stuffed in there. You can see it in the above video, as I took the video after a few weeks of this behaviour.

I went online and started Googling everything I could about what I had noticed. I narrowed it down to sour crop and possibly egg bound.

From what I read, the egg bound thing was most urgent, so I brought her into the grow/soap/worm room and drew her a warm epsom salt bath.

Sorry, but this room is not equipped with a bidet

She spent a day and night in the house, while I massaged her crop, gave her mineral oil, and kept her from eating grass and other unknown substances. She was very calm, and after her bath, I inspected for a bound up egg, but there was none. I then went to the pharmacy and picked up a 150 mg capsule of Fluconazole (Canesten) and opened it up to divide the powder into three portions.

The Pharmasave store brand capsule was $3.90, but they only had one, so I got Gerri to pick some up while she was in town. She went to Walmart, and they charged more than $13 for a generic capsule there. That seems like a lot, when you can get the same thing from Canesten for $19 and it comes with other things as well.

Luckily, our pharmacy was able to get some more in within a couple of days, so we were alright.

I then mixed up the powder with probiotic yogourt and some powdered calcium, and gave it to Henny P under the tongue with a medicine syringe. She was not very fond of that, but in two days she was better, so I was okay with her discomfort.

After her water balloon crop had gone back to normal, I noticed that she had a ball of impacted hay, grass, or twine in her crop. It was also pendulous, which means it had stretched out and was hanging down too far for her food to get into her gizzard.

There is such a thing as a crop bra, that would have been easier to use, but It seemed like a long time to wait, so I went to the thrift store and bought a few old pairs of hockey socks and some compression socks to try a few ideas of my own.

The hockey socks turned out to be a bit big, but I think a kids pair would have been snug enough. The compression sock was perfect, but it only took her a week to pretty well shred it. It also took her a few days to get used to it, but she was okay after she did.

I would get the frayed edges sewn up, if I had to do it again.

I spent a lot of time each day carrying her around and massaging her crop ball, which paid off when I went out one morning about a month ago and the impaction was gone! I made her a new bra, to keep her crop up above her gizzard, and everything was going great.

Until last week.

I went out in the morning to turn their light on and gather the eggs, and I noticed Henny’s chest was puffing up again. I came home from work and gave her another dose of the Fluconazole/yogourt mix, and started back with the massaging. After a few days, it wasn’t getting better, and she was back doing the crazy neck movements again. I thought that I was going to have to put her down, but she seemed to be enjoying her life still, so I didn’t have the heart to do it.

She was always the first one to the cup when I brought the mealworms and other treats out, but she was spending more and more time with the two new hens in the coop. She slept in the nest boxes, or under them, and was eating and drinking as she normally would, so I figured I would let her keep going.

And going, and going.

Probably two months ago I told Gerri that I didn’t think Henny was going to make it through the night. I had resigned myself to the fact that it wasn’t smart to take her to the vet(if one would even see her) and spend $150+ to get crop surgery for a hatchery chick that might have a chronic condition. She had been like this for all of her adult life, as we only got a week or two worth of eggs from her before this all started.

This is her fancy hockey sock turtleneck for autumn walks and cool nights in the run.

Well, I’m happy to say that she made it about two months after my initial diagnosis, and sad to say that I found her dead on the coop floor this afternoon. I had been preparing myself for the day I would find her there, but I didn’t think it would affect me like this.

I guess it was because I had spent so much time with her while she was ill, that she seemed more like a pet than livestock, but in the end she was a sick chicken that didn’t lay eggs, and I guess that’s why I’m not really broken up over it. She was my favourite, and I hope that eventually I get another girl that loves to get picked up and carried around like she did, but hopefully it’s under healthier circumstances.

Anyhow, sorry for the long post, but it’s been a while. I guess I just needed to get some motivation to write.

Chris

Getting Ready For Winter

Well, I know it’s only the first part of October, but we have already had a couple of good snowfalls so far and it’s getting pretty frosty overnight, so I figured I had better get moving on this.

The Chickens

I have decided, after extensive reading and chatting with other hen fanciers, not to heat the coop for the winter. I will instead, winterize the waterer with a handy little water heater that I built from a design on The Chicken Chick’s website and throw an electric heater in for when it gets below -20C.

I bought a lamp kit from Amazonand a cookie tin from the thrift store, but then I found a working lamp with no switch for $1, so I grabbed it. I grabbed a second tin and might build another one for our friend Carol.

You just need to drill a hole in the side and insert the lamp cord through to the inside. Don’t forget to keep one of the screw on washers on the outside though. It is a pain to have to undo everything and fix it after.

Probably.

Not that I did that or anything.

heater2
I’m sure that somebody’s nana thoroughly enjoyed these imported cookies.

The lamp came with a 100W bulb in it,but after a couple of minutes of being plugged in, the paint started to smell a bit burny. I switched to a 60W and might even go to the 40W that she recommended. I just figured that being thousands of kilometres north of where she lives, we might need to ampwatt things up a bit. I guess that isn’t the case.

With the reflective inside, it also makes a powerful spotlight with the 100W bulb in it.
With the reflective inside, it also makes a powerful spotlight with the 100W bulb in it.

I also ordered the TC-3 Thermocube to help out with the system, because it will come on at 1.7C(35F) and shut off at 7.2C(45F). This will prevent overheating the plastic waterer, save on bulb life, and save on hydro by not running the light when it isn’t necessary.

I will probably get one of the TC-1 Thermocubes for the block heaters on the vehicles as well, because they probably suck back a lot of power running twelve hours or so every day. I guess the heat tracing on the pipes could use it as well.

So many handy things nowadays for making our lives easier.

The Worms/Plants

Because I decided against heating the coop, the worms had to be brought back into the house and put into what is now our soap/grow room.

I set up the Plant Tower and went to buy a 24″ sunblaster, but realised that I would need one for every shelf, so I bought the 48″ Sunblaster and put it on the ceiling to give the whole room some really nice, white light. What’s cool is that I can link up to eight of these on the one power source.

I bought these and the setup for sprouting grain from Dunvegan Gardens in Fort St. John, but if you aren’t near there, the prices are the same on amazon.ca.

Oh yeah, the grain sprouting is for the chickens to have lots of fresh grass to eat all winter. I bought an Aquascape 91026 320 GPHpump and a bunch of 1/2″ line to run up the Plant Tower with some 1/4″ line feeding down to the trays. It was probably overkill for the amount we will need, but we plan on doing more in the future, so we got all of the connectors and tools now, so we could learn more as we go.

For connecting the 1/4″ into the 1/2″ I had to buy a punch and some connectors

I have a bin of water on the bottom shelf  and I pump the water up every four hours into the top tray and it filters down through holes I drilled into the tray into the bottom tray and then through it back into the bin.

I am trying half a tray of oats followed a day later by half a tray of wheat.
I am trying half a tray of oats followed a day later by half a tray of wheat.

Well, it used to go every four hours, when I had the awesome timer hooked up, but I stole it for the lights and have to get a new one now. I just plug it in when I am thinking of it a few times a day, and it seems okay for now.

This video by The Straw Hat Farmer is what got me interested in this in the first place, and then got me interested in aquaponics. Check out his YouTube channel for lots of informative videos.

We also have a mango tree growing in the grow room, with garlic planted there as well. The mango was growing in the worm bin, so I transplanted it and it seems to be doing well.

I don't know what causes the crook in the bottom, but we'll see how it turns out.
I don’t know what causes the crook in the bottom, but we’ll see how it turns out.

It started sprouting new growth since we moved it into fifteen hours of light.

Hopefully in eight years we will be munching on our own mangoes.

Chris

A Little Autumn Update

The Soap

We got a big box of fragrance oils in, and amongst them were some holiday scents that we hope to get out before next spring. There’s some pretty nice ones, so we have been smelling bottle caps for a week or so. Nobody has passed out from the fumes yet, so that’s good.

We also had the fall fair last weekend, where we entered Wildfire, the shampoo bar, and Gerri put in some red pepper jelly.

The soap and shampoo got first place and the jelly got third, so we were pretty proud and happy while we manned the Dirty Bird booth there.

Next year we hope that someone else will put in some soap and shampoo to go up against us.

Oh yeah, our friend Sarah made us a shelf and a bunch of soap holders. These are them.

The holders are teak and the shelf is reclaimed pallet wood.
The holders are teak and the shelf is reclaimed pallet wood.

The Chickens

So the last update told you that Red was laying, but now Henny P is laying too!

She also uses the nesting box, which pleases me to no end, but the really cool news is that I noticed a trend that I hope keeps happening.

Red started eating earthworms and ants, and a few days later she was pumping out eggs. Same thing for Henny P, so when I was digging out the slabs of stone in the walkway, I was pleased as punch to see one of the Barred Rocks steal a worm from Red’s beak and gobble it down. Then she started actually standing her ground with the Rhode Islands and digging up her own worms. Yahoooo!

I am guessing that it has to do with them knowing that their bodies need protein to keep up with the egg laying, just like the oyster shell that I see them peck at now and then. I will probably look that up, but not right now, as I want to see if I’m right about the trend on my own.

This is either Oreo or Pepper. They're identical twins to me.
This is either Oreo or Pepper. They’re identical twins to me.

We are starting to get the amount of eggs that we use, so it shouldn’t be long before we are getting abundant in them. I hope that leads to more cakes and other treats being baked, but I would settle for just knowing we have enough food for us and maybe a friend.

It’s a pretty good feeling when things work out.

The Harvest

I told you about the apricot and plum trees, but I had no idea at the time about how amazing the plums were going to be. We didn’t think they would amount to much at all.

This is what we shook off today.

The egg was harvested at the same time. Good old Henny P.
The egg was harvested at the same time. Good old Henny P.

Altogether we have taken about three gallons of plums from what we thought was a waste of a tree. I don’t know what kind of plum they are, but they are very sweet and juicy. I am going to try rooting a few cuttings from it, and planting a few seeds, because if it is hardy for this area, then I want to keep it going.

It is also pretty diseased now, so in case this is a last hurrah, I want to have some sort of stock for the future. I would hate to think that it will last for years, only to lose it in the winter.

The Boy

Since Blue got away in the spring, and decided to run rampant through the mountains, he has slowed down considerably. He did go for a little toot through the neighbourhood last weekend, but other than that he sticks pretty close to his folks.

Sometimes he gets tired after a few chases of a toy.
Sometimes he gets tired after a few chases of a toy.

We aren’t quite sure what he tangled with, but his slight limp hasn’t gone away, and he doesn’t like running for much more than a kilometre or two any more. We are okay with that.

One thing that I was worried about when we got the chickens, is that he would always try to chase them, but after a bit of gentle correcting, he is actually more timid with them than they are with him. Unless he’s running towards them, then they get out of the way.

I actually think that he would make a pretty good farm dog, and we hope that he makes it long enough to see that. He’s slowing down a lot, but I like to think that he’s just pacing himself for when he has acres to roam leisurely about.

Here’s hoping, Boy.

Chris

Hey, Thanks A Bunch

I got a wonderful email today from Amazon.ca telling me that they had deposited a payment into our account. Wahoo!

As we’ve mentioned before, if you go through any Amazon link on this site and buy anything from Amazon within 24 hours of clicking through, we get a referral fee from Amazon.

You can learn more HERE.

Well, some of you have done this, and we just wanted to thank you for that.

It’s not going to make us rich or anything, but if the monthly amounts keep going the way they have been, the money earned will be enough to pay the web hosting fees for the year.

That’s a nice savings, and it is appreciated. The way we look at it is that every little bit helps, and we don’t want to take anything for granted. I just wanted you to know that it means a lot to us, and the money is actually going somewhere that is really helping out.

So thank you. Thanks for clicking and putting a bit of dough back in our wallets, but most of all thanks for stopping by. We really love hearing from you, and because we are horrible at keeping in contact with our friends, this is generally the only way we do it.

Hopefully that doesn’t make us bad people, we just get caught up in life, and time gets away from us. It’s not that we don’t want to talk to anyone.

You understand, right Mom?

Anyhow, the mealworms and the composting worms are doing fantastic, and the chickens are good, but Red keeps laying eggs while roosting. I went out at about 5 AM and put her in a nesting box, and when I opened the coop at 7, she had a beautiful little egg that wasn’t smashed on the floor, so I will keep doing that until she learns, I guess.

We are also looking into black soldier fly larva, sprouting grains, and aquaponics for the future, so that’s pretty exciting. For me. I’m a real nerd when it comes to this stuff.

Chris

 

A Whole New Life

This was the living quarters for four hens, two days ago.
This was the living quarters for four hens, two days ago.

First off, let me say that I fried my PC laptop with a glass of mead about a week ago, so I am now using Gerri’s iMac to write posts.

It’s definitely a learning curve, but I will persevere. I’m just warning you because I can’t figure out how to resize photos, so things might get a little wonky.

So this is a photo of one shed with a lean-to built onto it from last year, before we moved in.

coop5

We scoop a lot of free wood from the dump, so when we decided to use the shed as a chicken coop, there was some cleaning to do. After pulling all of the stuff out of there, this is what we were left with. The only money we had to spend was on the wire, and it came to less than $25, so we were pretty happy about that.

That trailer is a whole other project that is finally happening.
That trailer is a whole other project that is finally happening.

I bought a couple of 8′ lengths of hardware cloth and cut them to size. There wasn’t many squareangles in this project when I started, and the hardware cloth is more square than Erkel, so I used a bunch of the dunnage wood that I collected last summer for the worm boxes, to make things look straight.

It also really helped to strengthen and stabilize the wall and wire.
It also really helped to strengthen and stabilize the wall and wire.

The ceiling was already there, because there was a lot of stuff already being stored up there on some sheets of plywood that had already been pulled out of that camper trailer.

I might try a small rainwater containment with those eavestrough ends and downspout. I assume chickens will drink rainwater.
I might try a small rainwater containment with those eavestrough ends and downspout. I assume chickens will drink rainwater.

After all was said and done, it looked like this.

That hole was already in the wall, so I decided to leave it alone and build a ramp up to it. They seem okay with that.
That hole was already in the wall, so I decided to leave it alone and build a ramp up to it. They seem okay with that.

I plan on doing more perches out here, because they seem to like them a lot. It seems that the higher, the better. I guess that it has to do with predators. For some reason, I think I have heard that somewhere.

From there I went inside the shed and did this.

Because it will be heated all winter, We will be keeping the worms out here under the bench.
Because it will be heated all winter, We will be keeping the worms out here under the bench.

The bench was initially built out of the worm box wood, to set the worm boxes on, but I think that holding the nesting boxes is a better alternative. I am going to have to move the feed sacks and put their water, oyster shell, and food under the top shelf, because they seem to congregate up top and that makes for a messy dining room.

This can be observed in the photo of their dust bath.

I thought it would be nice to give them a dusty bit of dirt and shale to enjoy throughout the winter months.
I thought it would be nice to give them a dusty bit of dirt and shale to enjoy throughout the winter months.

My friend is going to give me a bale of hay to use instead of shavings, because she tells me that they love to peck at the seeds and bugs that get into it. I’m sure it is also better nest building material for them, but don’t quote me on that.

Speaking of nests, we have started getting some of these.

These are the ones that seemed good. There were a few more that had either very weak shells, or no shells at all.
These are the ones that seemed good. There were a few more that had either very weak shells, or no shells at all.

They are small, but I’m told they will get bigger, and stronger. I hope so, because Red had a broken one with just a membrane under her this morning. She was acting pretty weird last night, and I was a little worried about her, but after giving her a few hugs this morning, she got right back into her routine.

I’ve been letting them run loose when I’m home, which is all the time while I’m laid off, and we really enjoying having them trotting around the yard, posturing for bossiest hen position. The dogs don’t even bother them anymore, and seem to really enjoy following the girls around.

It could be because of all the nutrient rich poop that seems to appear out of nowhere. For some reason, they will not stop eating it. Not only does it bother me because of the whole poopy breath factor, but we got the chickens to fertilize the lawn.

Ah well, one thing at a time.

Chris

P.S. We’re always open to new ideas in our endeavour for a simpler life. If you have anything you’d like to share, please feel free to comment on here, or in our Backyard Homesteading community on G+.