Category Archives: Chris

Hand Made Soap Coming Soon

By the way, “soon” is a relative term.

When I first moved to Hudson’s Hope, I used to go to the Farmer’s Market every Tuesday. My first time there, I bought some soap that was made by a local woman named Cindy.

I couldn’t believe how good they all smelled, and how expensive they were. I think they were $4 a bar or something like that, but I was newly single and pulling in pretty good bucks driving a tanker, so I splurged and bought a couple of bars.

I have never resorted to buying commercial bars since that day.  Sure, they were a bit more per bar, but each bar lasted longer and I liked that I was putting all natural ingredients on my skin, while supporting a local entrepreneur. Can it get any better?

I bought a bag of bars before I moved back to Ontario, and was just about through them when I met Nancy at the Harwood Waterfront Festival. She was selling bars of homemade soap at her booth there, so I was able to get my fix of cleanliness there as well.

She has a really nice little business called Northumberland Soapworks at her farm near Colborne, Ontario, where she sells in a roadside shop, and hits up a lot of local markets.

My favourite was Orange Patchouli, or as I liked to call it, Dirty Hippie Soap. Yes, I know that it is an oxymoron. The hippies would be squeaky clean after washing up with that sweet cake.

 

After we moved back to Hudson’s Hope this summer, I ran into Cindy, and mentioned that I would be needing some more soap after our stock ran out, when she broke the news to me.

She wasn’t making soap anymore.

We bought eight bars and talked about the soap making process, and I may have mentioned that we might start making our own if we couldn’t find any. We also contemplated getting Nancy to ship us out some when Cindy said that she would sell us the lye that she had left over, and that she had moulds and stuff left as well.

Wahoo!

What better way to work towards sustaining ourselves than being able to make our own soap and possibly supplement the cost by selling a few bars to the locals or through the blog?

I know you won’t get rich at it, but we’ve never really aspired to be rich in the first place. We have aspired to be clean though, and soon we’ll be able to afford to bathe every day if we want to.

I know I won’t want to, but I think that Gerri enjoys not having flies buzzing all around her, so even if we could keep her clean, I can sell my bars and get enough money to buy the laying hens I want to get this summer.

Anyhow, I will be excited for us to learn the art from someone who made some of the finest soap I’ve ever used, and maybe a month or so later, having a shower with that handmade goodness.

I love trying to be a granola.

Backstory – The Worms

I’ve been looking into getting composting worms for many years now, but never had the time or space for them.

Then I found some.

I was hauling clay out of a guy’s yard where he was building a new house, to some big pipeline company’s new yard, when I saw a bunch of 1″x4″ spruce planks about four feet long in a burn pile.  I asked the guy if I could have them, and he said to take all I wanted, so I started loading up the dump truck. There were a lot of them, and as I got deeper into the pile my smile just got wider. I figured there were about ten or so of them at the start, but there was a fire ban on, so I was able to load about twenty armloads into the box.

All in all, I filled the trunk and backseat of the old Corolla to the top and got home with dreams of making worm boxes and changing the small, insulated shed into my wormy empire.

I just needed worms now.

I started looking online, but saw that red wigglers were going for about $60 a pound, plus shipping. I really couldn’t afford that, as we had just moved here from Ontario, and it was a pretty slow year, work wise. I figured that there had to be  a better (cheaper) way to do this.

I called the Northern Environmental Action Team in Fort St. John, while I was in town and asked if they knew anyone locally that had red wigglers for sale. They said that they had some for sale at their office, so I boogied right over there and bought a pound. They had them in one of these

I wished I had the cash for one of them, because they told me it worked pretty slick, but it kind of defeated my purpose. I’m trying to keep as much plastic out of my life as I can, so I’m kind of glad I was broke and couldn’t buy it.

When I got home, I poured the worms into their oversized new home, but it was mostly castings, with very few wigglers. I went back in a few days later and stopped in for some more. There were more worms in this batch, but it was still not as many as I was expecting. It didn’t really mater though, as I was still $20 under the pound from the internet, and there was no shipping costs.

I started to read a lot about composting worms, and watched a bunch of videos on them. The first book I read was

I might have made my box a little big at 2’x2’x10″ high. A pound of worms could easily fit in a tube sock, so I had quite a bit of overkill for the first several months. I ended up putting them in an old laundry tub that a friend was throwing out, and I really like it. They seem to be quite comfy in there, and as long as I mix it up every few days, it doesn’t get too wet.

It's a pretty good home for a few pounds of crawlies.
It’s a pretty good home for a few pounds of crawlies.

Anyhow, it’s been about six months, and I have probably six times as many worms as I started with, so they must like me alright.

Chris

Backstory – Chris

I grew up in a village of around 200 people on the shores of Rice Lake, near Cobourg, Ontario. It was an idyllic place to grow up, and probably still is. My mom still lives there, and whenever I go to visit, everything looks pretty much the same as it did when I was a kid.

Photo courtesy of Gabrielle Holowacz https://www.flickr.com/photos/gabi2418
Photo courtesy of Gabrielle Holowacz https://www.flickr.com/photos/gabi2418

Sure there are probably fifty more houses scattered around on once rich farmland and forest, but there are no new businesses to speak of. The old school has been a bakery, roadhouse bar, restaurant/convenience store, and is now a closed down Chinese restaurant. The gas station/garage has changed hands probably four times since my youth, and the convenience store has changed hands a few more than that. The post office/store has closed down in favour of a row of boxes on the side of the street, and that about does it. 

I would probably have elected to move there and pursue my dreams of a small, self-sustaining lifestyle, but the red tape required to achieve such a goal would cost much more than we would save. Just the environmental assessments and whatnot to find a building site, well, and septic would probably cost more than what I plan to spend on a piece of property out here, and the land costs are horrendous.

For example, an 11 acre lot that is in a farm field close to half an hour north of town would cost $100000, and that doesn’t guarantee you could build there.

This was the view provided by Realtor.ca. I assume that it's the best one.
This was the view provided by Realtor.ca. I assume that it’s the best one.

Because the area has been environmentally protected, you have a lot of hoops to jump through to get the building process started, let alone finished. Then you need to find a job that pays enough to afford it, while living somewhere else, because it’s going to take a long time before you are able to move into the home you just built.

That was the trouble I had there. The best paying job I was able to get was $18/hour and it was a 30 minute drive from where I would be building. It was also one of the most stressful jobs I’ve ever had. Driving to Toronto and back in a tractor trailer every weekday. I did find a job I liked with a farm supply and grain company, but it only paid $13/hour and you were laid off for a lot of the year. You can’t raise a family on that.

So we headed west. I have been living and working out here since 2000, and we’ve been here as a family since July 2015. It’s a different way of life, but it’s one that I like, and have gotten quite used to. The housing is very affordable, so we were able to buy a place while we look for a piece of property that we love and can build a little off-grid paradise of our own.

Until then, we are going to try and figure out how to do things from our house, with our sheds and beautiful little yard. You know, for practice.

I started with worms, but first I read this book.

Chris