Trouble In The Worm Bin

So, as you may remember, I have a few different kinds of worms. No, not pinworms and tapeworms. I’m talking about mealworms and composting worms.

Red Wigglers and European Nightcrawlers are the composters, and so far the Euros have far outdone the wigglers as far as breeding and composting goes. That might have something to do with me though, as I have sort of messed up with their housing arrangement.

Pretty roomy digs.
Pretty roomy digs.

I took them out of the plastic bin they were in all winter, and put them back in the bin they started in. The trouble is that the wooden bin is far too big for the amount of worms I havehad. I say had, because I got a bit of an infestation of mites, flies, and rove beetles. I was trying to keep the paper and food moist and out to the edges, but because there is four square feet of space, but only nine square inches of worms, I was overfeeding and while everything was good in the centre, the outsides dried up and the food went moldy. This attracted a totally different bunch of pests to the bin. Some of which caused the worms to do not quite as well as they could have, had I thought things through.

The one that was the scariest looking, was the rove beetle larva. It turns out that it’s not scary, but if I was a worm, I think I wouldn’t want it lurking around my place.

rove beetle larva
Now you see why I was frantically crushing them when I found them. Right?

Now, I hadn’t seen any of the adults, so I wasn’t aware of what this thing was, and went on several insect identifying websites looking for a clue.

Absolutely nothing. I caught one and pinned it to some cardboard to get photos of it, but after I sent them off to the various sites, I saw a picture and realized that it was larvae that I was smushing all over the place.

Larvae that were probably helping me out by eating the ticks and stuff, instead of the worms.

You live and you learn.

I did harvest the castings from the Euros. I got over five pounds of this.

 

Yes, I get excited about poop.
Yes, I get excited about poop.

I promptly mixed it in with some peat moss and then mixed that into the gardens. I then harvested over a hundred pounds of strawberries from the newly fertilized plants.

That was all true, except for the strawberry part. There are lots of flowers and some little green berry nubs on there though. Everything is doing great, but the jalapenos aren’t getting much growth yet. Maybe they won’t, but I see them opening up a bit and possibly some little flower buds coming out, so I cling to hope.

We’ve decided that we won’t sell any more worms until we have a healthy population and are getting our compost needs met. We want to get our soil as healthy as can be, and when that happens we can look at branching out. The organic matter alone is worth what I paid for the worms, and you can really tell from the way things are taking off for us.

We have lots of excellent growth in the gardens, we aren’t throwing out any organic waste, and if I ever decide to go fishing, I won’t be paying $7 for a dozen worms. (Yes, it’s really that much.)

The other plus side is that I really enjoy being a worm rancher. It totally relaxes me, and it keeps me on my toes. I’m always researching about them, and I think that everything you can learn about your future is probably the best investment you can make with your time.

Researching led us to John, and he has got us fired up even more for growing our own food. Check him out and if you like him, subscribe to his channel. We try to watch a couple of videos a day.

He really does teach you a lot about all sorts of things related to growing your own food. I learn something new every day.

Chris

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